Owl’s Head Hike

Ryan and I loaded the kayaks in the truck and hit the road at 4 a.m. We had planned our trip to Owl’s Head Mountain in the Keene Valley, the High Peaks Region of the Adirondack Mountains, for weeks. The weather could not have been more perfect for hiking, and hadn’t dropped below 55 degrees F overnight. The goal was to be on the Owl’s Head lookout when the sun rose over the Green Mountains of Vermont, and crawled it’s way to some of New York’s greatest natural wonders, The Adirondacks, just in time for their spectacular fall foliage display. Along the way, somehow we tossed a kayak into the back window of Ryan’s Toyota Tundra, breaking the glass. How lucky we were that was to be the single downer of the entire day, and we got it out of the way before sunrise. As the dawn sky began to brighten, the ride was one of phenomenal beauty. The destination was gorgeous, the trail itself was beautiful, the view from the Lookout awe-inspiring. There are not enough superlatives to describe climbing up, standing on, or descending from that summit, so I must let photos speak for me. After the Owl’s head hike, we launched the kayaks on nearby Mirror Lake, and watched the sunrise again, this time over a granite bluff as it slowly spilled its way into our placid pool. A cormorant greeted us, and a pair of mergansers joined us. Or should I say we joined them? Along the way we passed the Lake Placid Olympic Training Center and the strange structure rising up out of the mountain woodlands; the ski jump tower, viewable from the road to the Adirondack Loj and South Meadows Wilderness Area. I’d suggest you see the Adirondacks some time, but then again these gems are some heirlooms I am tempted to keep for myself. You stay home, and enjoy the pictures. I’ll take care of the mountain climbing for you!  – Paz

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Hope you get a chance to get out and enjoy some of the lovely fall!
Remember, there’s more than one way to respond if someone tells you “Take a hike!”

Paz

Short Lens Project

Almost never do I remove the 55-300mm zoom lens from my camera. Primarily, its dedicated purpose is for photographing birds, so the long lens is always welcome. Sometimes 300mm is still too short! Using the long lens crops out a lot before the image is even framed, and so from time to time I’ll put the short lens on the camera. It’s an 18-55mm zoom, and gives me a very different perspective in the viewfinder. I will often see things I want to capture, and I am tempted to put the long lens back on, but I’m forcing myself to use the broader format sometimes, to add some variety to all the close-cropped images. Also to keep my mind’s eye open to the creative prospects of a new view on old things.

 

Joshi Daniel has a blog called “The 28mm Project”. It is almost always head shots of more-or-less candid portraits. We can see that Joshi must get in close to his subject to fill the frame. I think that’s the idea. To get really close and make an intimate portrait. I did that with some of the floral shots. I still have the short lens on the camera, and look forward to continued practice. I may even break out the focus doublers and do some macros.

That is, unless I see a bird that really needs its photo taken.

Keep pointing and shooting!

 

Paz

Springing

 

A March sampler from around the town and trails. Click any image to start a full-size carousel.

 

 

Gotta run. Trout are calling.

 

Paz