Snow Dogs

We were fortunate to have a local dogsledder, Kate Walrath of Run By Dogs, give us a demonstration at the village Library. She told us about different types of sled dogs, including the Siberian Husky and the Alaskan Husky. The latter is a smaller, rather plain looking dog. I was surprised to discover these canine competitors were about the size of my own Sassy June (a Chow-Husky mix called a Chusky). I thought sled dogs would all be big, strong 60-pounders. The small black dog with some white on her face (I wish I could remember her name) is actually a retired racer from Alaska. Racing dogs get a share of race winnings, and they are put into a “doggie 401k”. Kate’s place, called Run By Dogs, is a retreat for retired sled dogs as well as a training facility and a place to learn and enjoy dogsledding. The monies in the 401k’s pay for the dogs’ boarding and veterinary expenses.

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It was very cold that Saturday, as you can see by the apparel. It was in the mid-twenties, but no wind. It didn’t bother the dogs a bit, though. For the retired Queen from Alaska, this is probably equivalent to retiring to Florida! 

It’s good to get a different perspective sometimes.

 

Until next time,

 

Paz

June Gallery

What? August? Okay, so here’s the June Gallery. Three shoots really occupied me in June. First, granddaughter Ellie graduates from Pre-Kindergarten. Many pictures for Grampa to cry over. They grow so fast! Kids at that age are always photoworthy and touch the heart. Then, a trip to Forked Lake with son Ryan and pal Carl. Clouds rolled over Blue Mountain, and I sat and shot dozens of frames. Worthy of its own post, watch for “The Many Moods of Blue Mountain” as a Photoshoot post. The other biggy: Daughter Kerry surprises us with an impromptu wedding, as she makes an honest man out of her long-time beau (and domestic partner) Kenyon. A unique wedding by a unique couple, the whole thing took place right there on the farm, the reception in the barn. Without a doubt one of the best weddings I’ve ever attended (being Father of The Bride had no influence, I’m sure). I’ll do a Photoshoot post for that, too. It was a great time with some great pix, and some trix and pointers.

-Paz

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April Gallery

Thirty Frames Hath April.

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Much of April’s gallery is made up of photos of birds around the feeder on the side porch. Usually I look out this window from my comfy chair, and see all varieties of feeder birds. They thrill me with their beauty and entertain me with their antics. I was going to do a post called “Outside My Window”, or something, just filled with these shots. They’re less than perfect as they’re all shot through window glass. Still, you can’t diminish their beauty with just a piece of glass. Trout fishing in the snow was a new experience for me. Grandson Max is in the photo. As always, these are raw, unaltered “proofs” right from the camera.   -Paz

 

Trail Cam Highlights

Why did I wait so long to buy a Game Camera? I can’t imagine. If you’re not familiar with them, a Game Camera or Trail Camera is a digital camera with a motion sensor. It uses infrared illumination at night (so there’s no flash to startle the game). Some cameras shoot stills, some shoot video, some both. Well-equipped cameras can be set up to do either, or select the length of video recording after a trigger event.

Trail Cam

My Trail Camera is made by Wild Game Innovations, and I paid $40 US for it. (Claimed to be $69 US originally). I set it up on November eighteenth, and it has taken about 150 images since. Without further ado, here are the highlights. Click any image to start full-sized carousel.

 

All the neighbors cats, and a dog.

Deer and Deer Hunters

And a variety of critters.

Certainly the bobcat is the high mark so far, and the coyote ranks up there, too. There are black bears in the woods in and around Engleville, and that will be the “holy grail” goal.  Hope you enjoy these highlights.

 

Take care and keep in touch,

 

Paz